Like Water for Gold in El Salvador

News

By Robin Broad and John Cavanagh· Originally published in The Nation

The story of a community's effort to ban gold mining in El Salvador involves environmental martyrs, powerful economic interests, and a DC-based tribunal that can trump democracy.

Thirty years ago, several thousand civilians in the northern Salvadoran community of Santa Marta quickly gathered a few belongings and fled the US-funded Salvadoran military as it burned their houses andfields in an early stage of the country’s twelve-year civil war. Dozenswere killed as they crossed the Lempa River into refugee camps in Honduras.

Today, residents of this area, some born in those Honduran refugee camps, are fighting US and Canadian mining companies eager to extract the rich veins of gold buried near the Lempa River, the water source formore than half of El Salvador’s 6.2 million people. Once again, civilians have been killed or are receiving death threats.

Similar Entries

Meet some of the sustainers who power our work!

"I am a CISPES supporter because continuing to fight for social justice and a more people-centered country means continuing the dream and sacrifice of thousands of my fellow Salvadorans who died for that vision.” - Padre Carlos, New York City

Join Padre Carlos by becoming a sustaining donor to CISPES today!

Recent Posts

Police stop the Caminata Ecológica, including an artwork sculpture representing Monseñor Oscar Romero, behind razor-wire barricades.