Take Action in Solidarity with El Salvador!

1. Solidarity with Water Defenders!
Demand that El Salvador's Attorney General - funded and supported by the United States - drop all charges against eight rural leaders who are being criminalized for defending their community water system. It's time for the Attorney General to start prosecuting the real criminals - the corporate elite!

2. Tell Legislators in El Salvador NOT to privatize water!
The right-wing parties in El Salvador's Legislative Assembly are pushing a "Comprehensive Water Law" that would give corporations and private entities decision-making power over the national water system. They need to hear voices around the world echoing the demands of the Salvadoran people: water is a human right and belongs in public hands!

3. Tell your Congressional Representative to Support TPS!

Temporary Protected Status (TPS), a legal status which protects refugees whose home countries have suffered natural disaster or war from deportation, has become a victim of the Trump Administration's war on immigrants. Tell your Representative and Senators to defend the rights of all TPS holders by sponsoring the American Promise Act and the SECURE Act.

Meet some of the sustainers who power our work!

"I am a CISPES supporter because continuing to fight for social justice and a more people-centered country means continuing the dream and sacrifice of thousands of my fellow Salvadorans who died for that vision.” - Padre Carlos, New York City

Join Padre Carlos by becoming a sustaining donor to CISPES today!

Recent Posts

The new administration’s foreign policy priorities will be to “evaluate” the country’s diplomatic ties to Venezuela, Nicaragua, Cuba, and China, which, along with Palestine, are the countries where the FMLN’s opposition to U.S. intervention have frequently gotten them into hot water with the United States.

Representatives of U.S. organizations serving as international observers for El Salvador’s presidential elections warn that aggression from the Trump Administration could have an effect on Salvadoran voters. Photo: Diario Co Latino